Your browser version is outdated. We recommend that you update your browser to the latest version.

 

Does coffee offer health benefits?

Studies have shown that coffee does offer health benefits, including protecting against Parkinson's disease, type 2 diabetes and liver disease, including liver cancer and others. Coffee also appears to improve cognitive function and decrease the risk of depression.

"I have yet to come across a patient with cirrhosis of the liver who regularly drank four to five cups of regular coffee a day, " Dr. Sanjiv Chopra, MACP professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School.

"The beneficial effect is not the caffeine, but ingredients such as Kawheol and Cafestol which protect the liver in experimental animal models of liver injury. Coffee also contains chlorogenic acid which is one of the richest antioxidants," Chopra explained.

The questions should be, what's the quality of coffee that I'm drinking? And what gives me the most antioxidants in my coffee? Most people treat coffee as if it's all equal and it's not.

When shopping for a coffee, it needs to be specialty grade, because higher quality coffee offers the most antioxidants and you want a medium roast coffee to garner all the health benefits as there are diminishing health benefits and risks of producing harmful components when under - or - over-roasting.

When it comes to people who have pre-diabetes or at risk for liver disease, coffee might be an easy and natural addition to their daily diet positively impacting their health. 

So, if one of your new year's resolutions was to cut back on coffee, you may want to reconsider. Instead of trying to reduce your consumption, you may want to take a closer look at what quality of coffee you're drinking.

 

 

Coffee & Cancer

 

SCIENCE: Coffee consumption may offer protective benefits for post-menopausal breast cancer. Consumption of four cups per day was associated with a 10% reduction in postmenopausal cancer risk.

 

SOURCE: Coffee Intake Decreases Risk of Postmenopausal Breast Cancer: A Dose-Response Meta-Analysis on Prospective Cohort Studies’ by Lafranconi, et. al in Nutrients (2018)

 


 

SCIENCE: Coffee drinking is associated with a lower risk of colon cancer in women. A study showed that there was a 20% reduced risk of colon cancer in women who drank more than 3 cups of coffee per day, compared to those who drank less than one or less.

 

SOURCE: Coffee drinking and colorectal cancer and its sub-sites: a pooled analysis of 8 cohort studies in Japan by Kashino, et al.  for the Research Group for the Development and Evaluation of Cancer Prevention Strategies in Japan (2018)

 


 

SCIENCE: Drinking coffee may prevent recurrence of liver cancer in adults

 

SOURCE: ‘Protective effects of coffee consumption following liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma’ by Wiltberger, Lange, et al, in Zeitschrift fur Gastroenterologie (2018)

 

 

Coffee & Longevity

 

SCIENCE: A study from the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) looked at over 500,000 people, and found that coffee drinking was associated with reduced risk for death from various causes. 

 

SOURCE: ‘Coffee Drinking and Mortality in 10 European Countries: A Multinational Cohort Study’ by Gunter et al in Annals of Internal Medicine (2017) [Funded by IARC]

 


 

SCIENCE:  A study of over 500,000 people, spanning a decade, found that coffee drinking was inversely associated with mortality, including among those drinking 8 or more cups per day. 

 

SOURCE: ‘Association of Coffee Drinking with Mortality by Genetic Variation in Caffeine Metabolism’ by Loftfield, Cornelis, Caporaso, Yu, Sinha and Freedman, in JAMA Intern Med (2018)

 


 

SCIENCE: In a large study looking at over 400,000 people, coffee consumption was associated with lower likelyhood of death from disease.

 

SOURCE: ‘Association of Coffee Drinking with Total and Cause-Specific Mortality’ by Freedman, Park, Abnet, Hollenbeck and Sinha in The New England Journal of Medicine (2012)

 

 

Coffee & Diabetes

 

SCIENCE: Studies show that coffee drinkers are at a lower risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, which accounts for 90-95% of diabetes cases in the world. They also show that people who drink four or more cups of coffee daily have a 50% lower risk of Type 2 diabetes. 

 

SOURCE: ‘Coffee components inhibit amyloid formation of human islet amyloid polypeptide in vitro: possible link between coffee consumption and diabetes/ by Cheng et al, in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry (2011)

 


 

SCIENCE: Cafestol, a compound found in coffee, could help to stave off type 2 diabetes. The compound has been found to increase insulin secretion, reduce fasting glucose levels and improve insulin sensitivity in mice. 

 

SOURCE: ‘Cafestol, a bioactive substance in coffee, has anti-diabetic properties in KKAy mice’ by Mellbye et al, in the Journal of Natural Products (2017)

 

 

Coffee & Stroke

 

SCIENCE: The results of a survey looking at over 83,000 women over many years showed that coffee consumption may modestly reduce the risk of stroke among women.

 

SOURCE: ‘Coffee consumption and risk of stroke in women’ by Lopez-Garcia et al, in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association (2009)

 


 

SCIENCE: A study from the International Agency for Research on Cancer looked at over 500,000 people, and found that coffee drinking was associated with reduced risk for death from various causes, including stroke. 

 

SOURCE: ‘Coffee Drinking and Mortality in 10 European Countries: A Multinational Cohort Study’ by Gunter et al in Annals of Internal Medicine (2017) [Funded by IARC]

 


 

SCIENCE: A large-scale study in Japan found that higher green tea and coffee consumption was inversely associated with risk of CVD and stroke in the general population. 

 

SOURCE: The impact of green tea and coffee consumption on the reduced risk of stroke incidence in Japanese population’ by Kobubo et al, in Stroke (2013)

 

Coffee and Gallbladder

 

SCIENCE: Men who drink two to three cups of coffee a day have a 4% lower risk of developing gallstones than those who do not drink coffee regularly, and men who drink four or more cups a day have a 45% lower risk, according to a new study.

 

But only coffee with caffeine, which is known to stimulate contractions in the gallbladder and lower cholesterol concentrations in bile, was associated with the lowered risk. Caffeinated tea and soda did not have the same effect, the researchers reported.

 

SOURCE: A prospective study of coffee consumption and the risk of symptomatic gallstone disease in men.

 


 

SCIENCE: Consumption of caffeinated coffee may play a role in the prevention of symptomatic gallstone disease in women.

 

SOURCE:Coffee intake is associated with lower risk of symptomatic gallstone disease in women.

 

10% of our proceeds are donated to the Gary Sinise Foundation to help support the needs of our service men and women, veterans, first responders and their families.